Water, water, everywhere – Part 2

Paraphrasing Madam Pompadour – Après le déluge, moi

Predictably, after the flood we need to deal with the damage.

First call is to our home insurers to get that going. Yes, we’re covered. They will send an inspector and we’ll go from there. By the time the inspector arrives a few days later, edges of our beautiful new floor tiles are curling. The inspector says, OK you can remove the damaged tiles and replace them. Wait a minute, I’m not going to remove them. I expect a professional installation – I mean if my car had a dent, do you expect me to beat it out and get recompensed for the hammer rental?

The inspector agrees. get three quotes and send them to us. Once the work is done, we will re-inspect and if the work is finished, we’ll send you a cheque for the cost less the $250 deductible. I get one contractor – who is acceptable to the insurer – to visit.  He pulls up a couple of the swollen-edged tiles and say “These are done for”. I point out that there are more curled-edged tiles now than the day after the flood and that the underlay is damp. “Yes” says the contractor. “I’ll quote on replacing all the tiles and any underlay that’s visibly damp.” I disagree. Let’s do all the underlay since it’s inexpensive and easier than working around the ‘damp’ areas. And, since the tiles were on special (end of run), you need to forget about replacing some – they all have to go and be replaced with like quality. “OK”, says contractor. He will inform the claims adjustor and they will be in touch. I tell the insurance company if they want more quotes, then they need to find qualified installers willing to come and do the work. They concede and accept the one-and-only estimate.

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Water, water, everywhere – Part 1

A very wet week or so

Part 1
Mrs. B tells me that an upstairs bathroom tap is leaking and leaves for work. By way of background information, I’ve never actually observed this leak. Anyway, the search for tools reveals everything I need including washers of all shapes and sizes. So off I go to fix the leaky tap – except it’s one of those wonderful ‘washer-less’ taps that simply takes a cartridge with two O-rings. Off to the hardware store and finally track down a replacement cartridge which costs $14.95. That strikes me as a really bad deal because once upon a time you could fix a leaky tap with a 10-cent washer. After whining at the hardware ‘help’ desk, they reveal that although they do sell replacement O-rings they’ll just give me a replacement cartridge complete since the brand I bought has a lifetime warranty. I take my free replacement home and install it.

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Ecology & Economy

Technology fails, the ecology takes a hit, and my wallet gets lighter

When I got home the other night, I failed to notice that the pump in the fish pond wasn’t working. Hardly surprising, since I didn’t go out into the back yard.

Mrs B. however is much more observant. No sooner had she gone out to feed the fish when she noticed that the pump had stopped. Even though I’m “busy” with an urgent case of Freecell, she insists I look. Yes, I say, it looks as though the pump isn’t running.

After checking the pump filter and all the electrics, I reluctantly come to the conclusion that the problem is the pump. Since it’s almost dark, I assume that that’s enough yard work for one day and go back to Freecell. Mrs B. disappears in her new car.

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